Marc Renneville

ORCID iD
https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5231-1167
  • Country
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France

Sources:
Marc Renneville (2016-11-01)

  • Keywords
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History of Human Sciences,

Sources:
Marc Renneville (2018-06-19)

Phrenology,

Sources:
Marc Renneville (2018-06-19)

Digital Humanities,

Sources:
Marc Renneville (2018-06-19)

Criminology,

Sources:
Marc Renneville (2018-06-19)

Criminal Justice,

Sources:
Marc Renneville (2018-06-19)

Gabriel Tarde,

Sources:
Marc Renneville (2018-06-19)

Alexandre Lacassagne,

Sources:
Marc Renneville (2018-06-19)

Cesare Lombroso,

Sources:
Marc Renneville (2018-06-19)

Virtual Museum

Sources:
Marc Renneville (2018-06-19)

  • Websites
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Criminocorpus. Revue hypermedia

Sources:
Marc Renneville (2016-11-01)

Museum of the History of justice, Crime and punishment

Sources:
Marc Renneville (2016-11-01)

All Publications and Communications

Sources:
Marc Renneville (2016-11-05)

Biography

CNRS Senior Research Fellow, Marc Renneville is a historian of science specialized in the study of crime and criminals. He has also been an associated member of the Alexandre-Koyré Center since 1998 (UMR 8560). Renneville’s research addresses the criminal sciences and other knowledge regimes which study criminals, as well as their application in the administration of penal justice. He is the author of two books: Crime et folie. Deux siècles d’enquêtes médicales et judiciaires (Fayard, 2003) and Le Langage des cranes. Une histoire de la phrenology (Empêcheurs de penser en rond, 2000). The latter received the prize for best history book at the French Society of the History of Medicine (2000). Marc Renneville was the first director of the new TGIR Huma-Num (UMS 3598), the “very large research infrastructure for the digital humanities” (2013-2015). He has been at the head of the digital project Criminocorpus since its inception (2005). In 2008, he initiated the creation of the journal Criminocorpus at the portal revues.org. In 2014, he organized the creation of a virtual museum of the history of justice, gathering exhibits, site visits, and thematic collections together on the Criminocorpus platform.

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