A Year in ORBIT

Josh Brown's picture

A year ago, we launched the ORCID Reducing Burden and Improving Transparency (ORBIT) project. Find out how far we've come since then in this post by ORCID staff Josh Brown and Tom Demeranville, who are leading the project.

Establishing ORCID Consortia from the Center

Josh Brown's picture

In this blog post, we look at how three communities used a centralized approach to adopt ORCID. Each started out with specific priorities and challenges that shaped the way they chose to build ORCID into systems and services and, ultimately, affect the working lives of the researchers they serve.

ORCID in ORBIT: Building Information Infrastructure with Research Funders

Josh Brown's picture

Research funding organizations are a core component of our mission and vision, and have been involved with ORCID since before we launched the Registry. Here we report on our work with funders, including the ORBIT project.

What's So Special About Signing In?

Josh Brown's picture

You may be wondering why researchers are asked for their ORCID sign-in details  to add a new connection to their record. There are two reasons: principle (we believe researchers should always be in control of their data) and practical (we want to provide transparency and trust for all the connections ORCID helps to make). This blog post sets out how this works, why it's important, and how it helps you.

All about flow: ORCID and research information management systems

Josh Brown's picture

Learn how ORCID is working with current information research systems (CRIS), such as Conversis, Pure, and Symplectic Elements, which help organisations to understand and analyse their research performance by pulling together data from external resources and augmenting information from within the organisation, to provide an overview of their researchers’ body of work. 

Organisations: the missing link?

Josh Brown's picture

Persistent identifiers (PIDs) for people (researchers and other contributors), places (research institutions and organisations), and things (works and other contributions) are a vital element of the research infrastructure. Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) are now clearly established as the industry standard identifier for works, and ORCID iDs are increasingly being adopted as a way of uniquely connecting researchers with other professional and personal identifiers, as well as with their works, affiliations, and awards. But what about persistent identifiers for organisations? Read how ORCID and THOR are joining forces with other organisations to help address this 'missing link" - and how you can get involved.