ORCID Webinar Workshop for Funders and Research Institutions

Wednesday, 23 April 2014.
Video & slides are available below.

Funding agencies, universities, and research institutes all face challenges of reliably identifying their researchers and monitoring outcomes over time. All researchers—and especially early career researchers seeking to establish their careers—need to be reliably connected to their research outputs, without the confusion common, changeable names creates. Graduate students and postdoctoral researchers supported by grants also have specific challenges: if they are not the PI, they are not included in grant information; they may not even know which grant(s) they are supported by; and as a result, the existing challenges of reliably tying publications to grant funding are even more problematic. The use of the unique, persistent ORCID identifier can help support outcomes tracking and evaluation

In 2012, the U.S. National Institutes of Health Biomedical Research Workforce Working Group made recommendations that the NIH should take to support a sustainable biomedical research workforce in the U.S. In the course of its study, working group members were “frustrated and sometimes stymied” by the lack of quality, comprehensive data about biomedical researchers. In response, NIH has recommended the development of a simple, comprehensive tracking system for trainees, implemented a shared, voluntary researcher profile system called the Science Experts Network Curriculum Vitae (SciENcv), and encouraged the adoption of unique, persistent ORCID identifiers for researchers. Additionally, NIH has begun collecting data about individuals in graduate and undergraduate student project roles who are supported by NIH grants. 

Research universities like Texas A&M are also responding by incorporating the ORCID identifier into their systems, enabling the improved identification, data collection, and career outcome tracking of students and postdoctoral researchers--and educating these early career researchers about the benefits they will receive from a unique, persistent research identifier. They are also beginning to link Electronic Theses and Dissertations (ETDs) to early career researchers' ORCID records. 

ORCID is an independent, non-profit organization that provides an open registry of unique and persistent identifiers for researchers and scholars. ORCID collaborates with the community to integrate ORCID identifiers into research systems and workflows, improving data management and accuracy across systems. ORCID enables interoperability between research systems worldwide, ensuring that researchers are correctly and automatically linked to their contributions. Since its launch in October 2012, ORCID has seen rapid adoption by more than 600,000 researchers and 130+ member organizations. 

Want to learn even more about how universities and other research organizations are using ORCID? Join us in May at the upcoming ORCID Outreach Meeting in Chicago. Registration is free. 
 

Workshop agenda

  • Welcome, introductions, and brief introduction to ORCID slides / video

Rebecca Bryant, ORCID

  • The adoption of ORCID identifiers by funding organizations slides / video

Funding agencies like the U.S. National Institutes of Health face challenges of reliability identifying their researchers and monitoring outcomes over time. In response to 2012 NIH Biomedical Research Workforce Working Group recommendations, NIH has recommended the development of a simple, comprehensive tracking system for trainees; implemented a shared, voluntary researcher profile system called the Science Experts Network Curriculum Vitae (SciENcv); and encouraged the adoption of unique, persistent ORCID identifiers for researchers. Additionally, NIH has begun collecting data about individuals in graduate and undergraduate student project roles who are supported by NIH grants. In this presentation, Dr. Shaffer shares how ORCID is being incorporated into SciENcv and will help with name disambiguation and improve data for NIH, and other federal agencies planning to adopt SciENcv. 

Walter Schaffer, NIH

  • Challenges and benefits of using ORCID for early career researchers and research organizations slides / video

Universities and postdoctoral affairs offices also have challenges of collecting meaningful data about the outcomes of their students and trainees. Early career researchers also face the challenge of not having their work discovered and recognized because of name ambiguity problems: common, changed, or misspelled names.  In this presentation, Melanie Sinche provides an overview of the local, national, and international challenges to collecting information about postdoctoral researchers, particularly related to career outcomes and funding. The use of ORCID identifiers within local and national data collection efforts can help facilitate more reliable information as well as information sharing.

Melanie Sinche, Harvard University

  • Establishing and curating scholarly identities with ORCID slides / video

Research universities like Texas A&M are creating ORCID identifiers for all of their students and incorporating ORCID into their systems, enabling the improved identification, data collection, and career outcome tracking of their students. They are also responding by educating these early career researchers about the benefits they will receive from a unique, persistent research identifier. In this presentation, Professor Clement describes TAMU's decision to adopt ORCID, how it addressed policy considerations, and how it has facilitated the creation of more than 10,000 ORCID identifiers for graduate students at this major U.S. research university. TAMU has been particularly proactive in its outreach efforts to educate graduate students and postdoctoral researchers about the importance of ORCID as part of their professional identity.

Gail Clement, Texas A&M University

About our speakers

Rebecca Bryant, ORCID 
 https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2753-3881
Rebecca Bryant is Director of Community at ORCID where she leads outreach initiatives to encourage the adoption of ORCID identifiers throughout the scholarly communications community. In this role, she coordinates the diverse ORCID Ambassadors program, provides oversight for the Sloan-funded Adoption and Integration program, and develops resources and communications. Prior to joining ORCID she served as Assistant Dean in the Graduate College at the University of Illinois where she led a diverse set of operations, including graduate career services, postdoctoral affairs, and overseeing academic policies and processes related to doctoral degree completion. In addition, she has experience defining and launching new technology initiatives including Electronic Theses and Dissertations (ETDs) and serving as a project leader the system-wide Banner ERP implementation team at Illinois. 

Rebecca Bryant
Gail Clement, Texas A&M University
 https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5494-4806
Gail Clement is an academic/research librarian with extensive experience in scientific and grey literature publishing, copyright education,  and digital library development. She is currently an Associate Professor in the Office of Scholarly Communication at Texas A&M University Libraries where she leads the ORCID integration project and manages the Online Access to Knowledge (OAK) fund in support of OA publishing fees. In addition to her work in academic libraries, Gail has served as a research assistant and information manager in scientific research settings in the lab, field and onboard ship. Her pre-MLIS experience and skills in data management, scientific publishing, and curation of  research collections are proving invaluable to current work in the scholarly communications, e-science, data management, and digital scholarship arenas.
Gail Clement

Walter Schaffer, National Institutes of Health
 https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2276-4656

Walter Schaffer serves as Senior Scientific Advisor for Extramural Research at National Institutes of Health and has played a key role in the implementation of recommendations set forth by the Biomedical Research Workforce Working Group.

 

 

Walter Schaffer
Melanie Sinche, Harvard University
 orcid.org/0000-0001-5238-9642
Melanie Sinche currently serves as Director of the FAS Office of Postdoctoral Affairs in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Harvard University. In this role, she serves over 1,000 postdocs across a variety of disciplines, assisting with their career and professional development, and advises university administrators on issues pertaining to postdoctoral scholars. Melanie has also been working with the National Postdoctoral Association to improve data collection on postdoctoral scholars across the U.S. 
Melanie Sinche