Roy A. Jensen, M.D.

ORCID iD
https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4430-2281
  • Keywords
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Breast Cancer, BRCA1, Breast Pathology

Sources:
Roy A. Jensen, M.D. (2013-10-23)

  • Websites
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The University of Kansas Cancer Center

Sources:
Roy A. Jensen, M.D. (2015-09-04)

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ResearcherID: B-9739-2011

Sources:
Clarivate Analytics (2015-09-04)

Biography

Roy A. Jensen, M.D. graduated from Vanderbilt University School of Medicine in 1984, and remained there to complete a residency in Anatomic Pathology and Surgical Pathology fellowship with Dr. David Page. Following his clinical training he accepted a research fellowship at the National Cancer Institute in the laboratory of Dr. Stuart Aaronson. He returned to Vanderbilt in 1991 and was appointed an Assistant Professor in the Departments of Pathology and Cell Biology. In 1996 Dr. Jensen was promoted to Associate Professor of Pathology and Cell Biology and was appointed as an investigator in the Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center. 
In 2004 Dr. Jensen was appointed the William R. Jewell, M.D. Distinguished Kansas Masonic Professor, the Director of The University of Kansas Cancer Center, the Director of the Kansas Masonic Cancer Research Institute, Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, and Professor of Anatomy and Cell Biology at the University of Kansas Medical Center. Dr. Jensen is a member of several scientific and professional societies including the American Association for Cancer Research, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Society for Cell Biology, the American Society for Investigative Pathology, and the United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology. He currently has over 150 scientific publications and has lectured widely on the clinical and molecular aspects of breast cancer pathology. Dr Jensen's research interests are focused on understanding the function of BRCA1 and BRCA2 and their role in breast neoplasia; and in the characterization of premalignant breast disease both at the morphologic and molecular levels.
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